Allergy / Immune (Herbs)

Anti-allergic herbs

The medicinal properties of herbs in treating and preventing infectious diseases have been widely known. Phytotherapy, or herbal treatment, is becoming more and more popular and cannot be underrated, even with the simultaneous notable advancement in chemical drugs production. Herbal medicines are distinguished by their mild action and lack of toxins and side effects. As a result, become a sensible alternative for patients willing to avoid negative impact of treatment on unaffected organs. Herbs can be used, for example, to prepare various types of infusions, tinctures, compresses or masks. Such herbs as wild rose, marshmallow, coltsfoot, sage, black lilac are widely known for trating symptoms of a common cold, others, like St. John’s wort, milk thistle, sweet calamus, dandelion, mint, chamomile are used to aid digestive system disorders, licorice and nettle are known for their strengthening effect, lavender, hops, lemon balm will soothe overwhelmed nervous system, but there are many more herbs with unique properties able to aid therapy in various ailments and it’s worth getting to know their power. The mixtures of herbs prove even greater efficiency providing synergistic help in fighting the whole spectrum of health conditions. In this section you will find the selection of specifics composed of herbs to aid your treatment.



Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 90 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 90 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)

English version Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 90 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)


Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 90 Veg Capsules (Now Foods) contains Ashwagandha and Withaferin A.
Ashwagandha (Whitania somnifera) is an herb that is extensively used in Ayurveda, the traditional herbal system in India. Ashwagandha is used as a general tonic and 'adaptogen', helping the body adapt to temporary normal stress. In addition, preliminary data suggest that Ashwagandha supports a...
Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 180 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 180 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)

English version Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 180 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)


Ashwagandha, 450 mg, 180 Veg Capsules (Now Foods) contains Ashwagandha and Withaferin A.
Ashwagandha (Withania Somnifera) is an herb that is extensively used in Ayurveda, the traditional herbal system in India. Ashwagandha is used as a general tonic and 'adoptogen,' helping the body adapt to temporary, normal stress. In addition, preliminary data suggest that ashwagandha supports a...
Boswellia Extract, 250 mg, 120 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)Boswellia Extract, 250 mg, 120 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)

English version Boswellia Extract, 250 mg, 120 Veg Capsules (Now Foods)


Boswellia Extract, 250 mg, 120 Veg Capsules (Now Foods) contains Turmeric, Curcuminoids, Curcumin, Boswellia Serrata and Boswellic Acid.
NOW Boswellia Extract is a standardized extract of Boswellia serrata, also known as Frankincense, a resinous botanical that has been traditionally used by Ayurvedic herbalists for centuries. The bioactive constituents of Boswellia, Boswellia Acids, have been shown in scientific studies to affect...
Boswellia Extract, 500 mg, 90 Softgels (Now Foods)Boswellia Extract, 500 mg, 90 Softgels (Now Foods)

English version Boswellia Extract, 500 mg, 90 Softgels (Now Foods)


Boswellia Extract, 500 mg, 90 Softgels (Now Foods) contains Boswellia Serrata and Boswellic Acid.
NOW Boswellia Extract is a standardized extract of Boswellia serrata, also known as Frankincense, a resinous botanical that has been used for centuries by traditional Ayurvedic herbalists. The bioactive constituents of Boswellia, Boswellic Acids, have been shown in scientific studies to affect key...

Herbs - References & External links

The references to scientific articles about Herbs are not meant to imply that any products treat, cure, or diagnose any disease or human condition. We encourage our audience to do their own research beyond the resources we have provided so your decision is as educated as possible.

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    Senna (Senna Alexandrina) is a world's natural laxative medicinal plant. Laxative properties are due to sennosides (anthraquinone glycosides) natural products.
    • VILANOVA-SANCHEZ, Alejandra; et al. Journal of pediatric surgery, 2018, 53.4: 722-727. PMID:
      CONCLUSION: There is a paucity of information in the literature regarding side effects of sennosides as a long-term therapy, and to our knowledge, this is the first review of Senna side effects in children. Senna induced dermatitis is rare, but may occur when patients need a higher dose. All of the cases described had a long period of exposure of the skin to stool. Besides the perineal rash with blisters, we could find no other described major side effect with Senna administration in the pediatric population or evidence of the frequently mentioned concern of the development of tolerance to Senna. Pediatric caregivers should advise families of the rare side effect of skin blistering and educate them to change the diaper frequently in children who are not toilet- trained to reduce stool to skin exposure. We can conclude from this review that Senna is a safe treatment option for constipation in children. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.